The RG Energy Control System

The RG Energy Control System applies the following technologies to increase electrical recovery:

  • Recycling of inductive energy
  • Low ESR pulse capacitors to store and discharge energy
  • Advantages of high voltage/low current.
  • The use of RG solid-state relay gate driver modules for precision pulsing
  • A pulse motor featuring non-ferrous, polycarbonate-cored coils

 

The RG Energy Recapture Model

The RG Energy Recapture Model consists of a NdFeB magnet which slides up and down the linear test stand.  At the base of the linear test stand is a polycarbonate-cored pulse coil upon which the magnet rests.  When the polycarbonate core coil is energized via the discharge capacitor, the magnet jumps.  Included in the energy recovery circuit is the recovery capacitor and the pulse controller. 

 

 

The RG Energy Recapture Model Demonstration 1

The polycarbonate-cored coil as an effective electromagnet is evident in the first demonstration.  When 50V is applied to the polycarbonate-core coil, the permanent NdFeB magnet jumps forcefully.  Four sets of this same coil are used to construct the pulse motor shown later in the video.

 

 

The RG Energy Recapture Model Demonstration 2

Using our recovery circuit, it is shown that more energy is recaptured at higher voltages.  In the first test,  8.55% of the 100 V input power is recovered.  When 300 V is applied in the second test,  the recovery increases to 15.25% of the input power. Normally, 300 V would create a higher magnet jump than 100 V. For purposes of our demonstration, the RG solid-state relay gate driver module is used create the same jump height through precision pulsing in both tests.

Note: Insert new table showing 100V test results and pulse width and 300V test results and pulse widths that match the info shown on the video.

 

 

The RG Pulse Motor Model

The basic components of our pulse motor are as follows:

  • The RG solid-state relay gate driver modules
  • Control unit
  • Rotor disks
  • 2 sets of polycarbonate-cored coils
  • Capacitor banks

 

 

The RG Pulse Motor Model Demonstration 1

The pulse motor was created to further illustrate the applied technologies of the RG Energy Control System. With 500V applied to the motor and with no attempt to regulate speed, the motor achieves 8600 rpm. This demonstration shows the capabilities of the pulse motor running on fixed-width pulses.

 

 

The RG Pulse Motor Model Demonstration 2

Precision pulsing is not only an effective way to capture stored energy in magnetic fields, it is also an excellent way to regulate motor speed as shown in the second demonstration.  As in the first demonstration, 500V is applied to the motor. As the motor attempts to accelerate past 5000 rpm, the motor controller automatically “kicks in” to regulate the speed of the motor.  The speed is maintained through continuous “pulsing” adjustments.  In order to achieve precision pulsing, the timing control system utilizes an optical sensor and real-time feedback. 

With the capability to make real-time measurements and to program the motor controller, the pulse motor is a practical and convenient tool for studying electrical efficiency.  Although not shown in this demonstration, a dynamometer was attached to the pulse motor to compare high voltage efficiency against torque. To view the results of this and other tests, please go to the General Motor Statistics and Data page.

 


 




The RG Energy Recapture Model Data

The following data shows the optimal efficiency in recycling the inductive energy in the RG Energy Recapture Model Data System.

Table 1 shows the optimal energy recovery efficiency for the two higher voltage supply, 300V and 500V, with controlled pulse width. There are two pulsing modes under which we run the test.

The single pulse mode is pulsing with a single pulse of specified pulse width. For 300V we run with a sequence of pulses of width from 100~500 us, and for 500V from 220~500 us. As shown in the table, the electrical efficiency of the circuit can overall reach 60% for these two voltage supply.

The gated pulse mode is pulsing with a long pulse, in a range around 6~12ms. Huge mechanical power can be obtained from pulsing in this range at the expense of loss of electrical efficiency. The gated mode programmed by the RG solid-state relay gated driver modules chops a long pulse into many small pulses. Under the gated mode, the recovery efficiency can still reach 52%~56% without changing the mechanical output.

Table 1

Applied Voltage

Pulsed Mode

Pulse Range

Optimal Efficiencies

300 V

Single

100~500us

61.54%

300 V

Gated

8ms

52.13%

500 V

Single

220~500us

59.61%

500 V

Gated

6~12ms

56.48%

 

The RG Pulse Motor Model

The following data compares the system performance with and without the energy recovery circuit of the motor

Table 2.a shows how the system efficiency of the motor is almost doubled by the energy recovery circuit. Under the load ranges from 30~75 oz.inches, the system efficiency with recovery circuit doubles that without the recovery circuit. In the other words, with energy recovery, the motor runs with half as much power as the one without energy recovery. As the load goes up to 100~250 oz.inches, the motor requires a little more than half of the power.

Table 2.a

500 Volts Motor

Torque (oz.inches)

Efficiency With Recovery

Efficiency Without Recovery

30

30.32%

15.24%

50

45.17%

22.87%

75

56.27%

29.56%

100

47.91%

30.20%

125

55.18%

32.24%

150

55.67%

36.71%

200

51.97%

34.02%

250

46.02%

24.25%

 

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Table 2.b and Table 2.c explain the differences displayed in Table 2.a by introducing two other ratios. Table 2.b shows the energy recovery ratio, that is, the percentage of the system output (in watts) that actually comes from the recovery energy. The data is collected from a test of running the motor without the recovery circuit. We design the test in a way that the recovery energy is dumped into a resistor and burned to heat. We measure the amount of the wasted energy that could be recovered. The first column of the table is the system output in watts for running the motor without recovery energy. The second column is the actual energy that could be recovered by the circuit if not dumped. The third column is the applicable energy with the recovery circuit. As shown in the table, the recoverable energy takes up about 48%--77% of all the applicable energy. From the data, consider an example of a motor with an output of 114 watt. Out of the 114 watts, 77% is the energy recovered from the collapsing field of the magnet, and only 23% is from the power supply.

Table 2.b

System Output (Watt)

Recoverable Energy (Watt)

Applicable Energy with Recovery Circuit (Watt)

Recovery Ratio (%)

25.72220635

88.27633136

113.9985377

77.44%

42.08432596

90.93510848

133.0194344

68.36%

54.74846229

68.65877712

123.4072394

55.64%

84.55703727

129.408284

213.9653213

60.48%

93.51301831

103.67357

197.1865883

52.58%

106.1124237

114.8262327

220.9386565

51.97%

103.5694245

96.6469428

200.2163673

48.27%

70.09430692

78.28402367

148.3783306

52.76%

 

Table 2.c shows the energy saving ratio, that is, percentage of energy the circuit saves. To obtain the same system output (in watts), the required system input with the recovery circuit and without recovery circuit are compared at column two and column three. With recovery circuit, the system requires 92 watts to produce a work of 28 watts. Without recovering energy, the system needs 183 watts. It saves 91 watts by using the energy recovering, which is about 49.73% of the input without the recovery circuit.

Table 2.c

System Output (Watt)

System Input With Recovery Circuit (Watt)

System Input Without Recovery Circuit (Watt)

Energy saving ratio (%)

27.96929

92.25

183.492

49.73%

48.03827

106.34

210.0317

49.37%

55.65007

98.9

188.2702

47.47%

97.74364

204

323.6658

36.97%

117.1398

212.28

363.3584

41.58%

118.0414

212.04

321.5445

34.06%

137.1925

264

403.2743

34.54%

125.9016

273.6

519.1841

47.30%